Writing about books from the reader’s point of view

Visually impaired readers have the same difficulties choosing what to read next as everyone else except that their choice is more limited by what’s available. Here’s an example of how to open up reading choices by grouping titles together round reading needs or experience and then writing about them in a tempting way.

The project created reader-centred taster compilations in large print, Braille and audio formats to give visually impaired readers a new way to choose what to read. Each compilation brought together an intriguing mix of titles with introductory text and reader comments. The large print booklists stand as a good example of how to approach a reader-centred promotion and how to write about books in a reader-centred way.

A Touch Of... booklists

Each list contains introductory text and ten recommended titles with reader comments. These comments offer an alternative view to the book synopsis or even the back cover blurb. They are short, punchy and personal with a strong focus on the reading experience rather than the plot. The list also details what other formats each title is available in, RNIB or Calibre talking books, NLB Braille editions and commercial audio.

The Touch of... project provided professionally designed booklists which were copyright free to be downloaded and reproduced by libraries. You can print out the A4 versions on any computer printer and then enlarge them to A3 on a photocopier so that the print is large enough for your target audience. Print off as many as you want when you choose.