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Whichbook of the week

A personal introduction from a Whichbook reader to a book you may not have met before

Noontide Toll

Noontide Toll

Reading this book was a very sensuous experience - it constantly called on my emotions as secrets unfolded from the past. I found it to be a sombre story that kept its warmth with moments of wit and the reassuring, sage-like counsel of the central character. I was held spellbound by the deep insights into human truths and the beautiful depiction of Sri Lanka

Posted by Laura Bell - more details

Tregian's Ground

Tregian's Ground

Religious intolerance wrecks lives ... a contemporary tale? No, this is Renaissance Europe. It teems with life: from weavers to lords and from Shakespeare to Monteverdi. Follow the footsteps of the unconventional Tregian, nobleman, musician and spy and listen to the lessons of the past.

Posted by Nicole Cornell - more details

Break in Case of Emergency

Break in Case of Emergency

The age-old problem of trying to ‘have it all’ bedevil our thirty-something heroine as she juggles the roles of wife, employee and best friend, while confronting the issue of a fertility ticking-time bomb. This biting satire will strike many a chord with anyone who has ever worked in an all-female workplace, with bitchy bosses and undermining colleagues.

Posted by Anne Horton-Smith - more details

These are the Names

These are the Names

Don't be discouraged by a grim story of refugees, trekking through the steppe in the bleak atmosphere of the post Soviet empire. It's an Exodus of sorts, without Moses but with a dash of deadly humour. Everyone is on a journey whether settled in town or an alien, and parallel lines collide when the migrants meet a police officer on his own spiritual quest. Can any of them, including the policeman, be saved? We can always hope.

Posted by Anne Jones - more details

Yuki Chan in Bronte Country

Yuki Chan in Bronte Country

Yuki, a young Japanese girl, comes to Bronte country to retrace her dead mother's steps. She has very little English, money or clothes - only her mother's photos. Befriended by a local girl, the pair set out on a journey of discovery across the Yorkshire moors. Their adventures include shooting a rambler, being bitten by a dog and breaking into a Care Home. Yuki is a brilliant and funny creation. Atmospheric and imaginative. I loved it!

Posted by Frances Bell - more details

The Rest of Us Just Live Here

The Rest of Us Just Live Here

Ever wondered what happens to teenagers who don't fight vampires, zombies or soul-eaters? They fight battles of their own, over families, identity, friendship, love and their future. Mikey will make you laugh, cry and remember...

Posted by Nicole Cornell - more details

The Transmigration of Bodies

The Transmigration of Bodies

A Romeo and Juliet scenario, but when the corpses in question were not lovers and he died accidentally, she of the plague, it takes all the Redeemer's ingenuity to prevent needless inter-family revenge. A dark and moody read - post-apocalyptic noir at its most stripped down.

Posted by Andrew Fitch - more details

The Prophets of Eternal Fjord

The Prophets of Eternal Fjord

A sensory assault into an inhospitable Greenland that seamlessly combines a hallucinatory, imaginative world with colonial history. The multi-stranded, audacious narrative has an intense emotional urgency that is somehow exhilarating despite the stark storytelling and enigmatic main protagonist. You may be shocked but will also appreciate the beauty.

Posted by Richard Ashman - more details

Into the Fire

Into the Fire

What an amazing book - it takes alternative history to a new and totally convincing dimension and what better story to retell than that of Joan of Arc - the Maid of Orleans. The dual narrative dovetails perfectly with equally compelling characters and actions in both time-zones. It delivers the fast and furious pace of a thriller coupled with elegant prose and intelligent historical detail. Authentic through and through - I loved it!

Posted by Fiona Edwards - more details

The Crooked Maid

The Crooked Maid

Vienna 1948 - a place where small actions can lead to tragic results and silence may seem the best policy. This novel is a wonderful evocation of the desperation felt by many at this time, including Austrians re-writing their recent pasts. A great read which also made me wonder how I might act under similar circumstances.

Posted by Rosemary Bullimore - more details

Blackass

Blackass

Furo Wariboko wakes on the morning of his job interview to find his black body has turned white. As a white man in a black world some doors now open for him as he invents a new identity for himself and turns his back on his family. This book explores race and identity with a light touch and will make you both laugh and think.

Posted by Paul Cowan - more details

Dragonfish

Dragonfish

This novel has all the key elements of a thriller but a backstory about displaced Vietnamese refugees gives it an extra dimension. I really warmed to all of the characters, even the heavies, because they are so compassionately portrayed. Readers hoping for a neat resolution may find themselves disappointed; I thought it the fitting end to a story about a woman who remains elusive to all, including the reader.

Posted by Wendy Smith - more details

Bitter Sixteen

Bitter Sixteen

This first volume of a trilogy introduces Stanly, an introspective loner and pop culture geek, who acquires superhero powers on his sixteenth birthday. So far, so typical for this genre, except for a most unusual wisecracking sidekick, who just happens to be a talking dog. Spotting the cultural references within the engaging interplay and snappy dialogue ensures this is will appeal to a wider age range than the target young adult audience.

Posted by Anne Horton-Smith - more details

The Good Liar

The Good Liar

This will take you by surprise. Not necessarily every twist and turn. But enough of them to keep you on your toes. Here is a morality tale for our times - the villain is villainous and definitely needs to be caught. It starts off like 'The Sting' but then turns a lot darker, as you are slowly led into the betrayal of the Schroder family to the Gestapo. I couldn't put this book down - hoping that the villain would meet his deserved fate.

Posted by David Kenvyn - more details

The Book of Memory

The Book of Memory

While on death row in a Zimbabwean prison, Memory begins to recount her story, at the centre of which lies her parents and Lloyd, and what may or may not have happened to Memory as a child. It is a story of unfolding revelations set against the backdrop of change in society. Befitting her name, Memory is a memorable character in a story beautifully told that you may want to read all over again once you've reached the final sentence.

Posted by Paul Doyle - more details

A Cup of Rage

A Cup of Rage

A torrent of anger, hatred and contempt flows through 47 pages without a stop. I can't say it made me understand sado-masochism but it certainly brought it to life in the most forceful way. Don't expect soft porn: this is a masterful study of sexual perversion.

Posted by Nicole Cornell - more details

The Lauras

The Lauras

Alex is agender and travels around America with 'Ma', a woman with her own agenda. Ma is out for revenge and retribution. She's a woman with a past and Alex witnesses and experiences things no child should see. Nevertheless Alex becomes strong and independent which comes through as the story progresses. This is a book where you never really know what's going to happen next - be it good or bad - and that's what makes it such a great read.

Posted by Karen Pugh - more details

The Well of Trapped Words

The Well of Trapped Words

Talking snakes and otherworldly grandmothers who require spoon-feeding are the stuff of folktales, and unpredictable honorary aunts and local dignitaries driven to extremes by bureaucracy and modernity are hallmarks of a traditional society not coping well with change. Kaygusuz's short stories open windows into Turkish life, brought together by her amazing dreamlike realism.

Posted by Andrew Fitch - more details

The Good Life Elsewhere

The Good Life Elsewhere

A dark humour runs through this tale of an impoverished Moldavian community seeking the utopia of Italy. Comedic elements creep in which made me smile despite the serious undercurrent of the story. A cast of characters attempt increasingly farcical ways of reaching Italy: the land of promise and opportunity. As soon as one attempt is thwarted, another hare-brained scheme is hatched.

Posted by Michelle Jenkins - more details

An Unnecessary Woman

An Unnecessary Woman

A childless divorcee for over 50 years, living in 21st century Beirut, Aaliya assumes most of her world will find her 'unnecessary'. As she faces old age - her biggest challenge yet - will her dry wit, intelligence and love for literature, art and her indomitable city prove enough to make her feel that she isn't completely useless? A fascinating read.

Posted by Rosemary Bullimore - more details